Qigong

Qigong (Ch'i Kong) is an internal martial art in which one learns to sense the Qi moving in ones own body. Advanced practitioners are able to move the Qi in their body at will.

Basically, Qigong is a quiet meditative activity with profound physical, mental and spiritual side effects.

Qigong is a great form of exercise, especially for those with osteoarthritis. It can help you build your leg muscles, strengthen your posture, and improve your balance, flexibility, and mobility. It also can teach you to relax and focus, even while executing the moves, and is a way to harmonize the musculoskeletal and nervous systems. In addition, it helps to develop concentration and coordination, and can reduce the risk of falls common with the elderly.


No matter if you hear ki explained a thousand time, you will never understand it on the basis of explanations alone. It is something that you must master on your own strength.
― Wang Hsiang-ch'i (Wang Xiangzhai)

This page presents several physical exercises that people have used to develop awareness of their Qi. The information below will be of particular interest to people how have taked the Qigong Practice class at Shanti Jujitsu Dojo.

We begin with a basic standing posture that is universally applicable. Next a couple of fundamental drills that are sometimes inserted into longer exercises; measuring the Qi and spread the Qi.

The standard rules are a collection of concepts that are conducive to the practice of Qigong. Instead of reminding the reader how to stand, where to focus and that the breath is vital we collected the key items into one list.

We will not attempt to "teach" these exercises because interaction with a knowledgeable teacher and guide is required for you to study this art safely for any length of time. Instead this page simple lists the names of the positions in hopes of serving as a reminder of what was taught in class (and as a seed for your notebook).

The exercises are:

Standing

Checklist of items for standing meditation:
Wuji center as center of gravity
From Warriors of Stillness.

If you were to give these standing instructions a name it would be Wu Chi. See also the standard rules for additional items.

Measuring the Qi

Measuring the Qi consists of two distinct motions assembled into four parts.
  1. Mix the Qi or spinning the Qi ball.
  2. Taffy pull, left hand high, then compress back into Qi ball.
  3. Mix the Qi or spinning the Qi ball.
  4. Taffy pull, right hand high, then compress back into Qi ball.
Measuring is done leisurely. Stay relaxed.

Spread the Qi

Arms at the sides, lift the arms by the wrists up to chest level in front as you raise onto the balls of the feet. In unison drop the arms to the sides and drop onto the heels. Repeat a few times.

This is done to spread the Qi around so that it doesn't get "congested" in the shoulders, arms and hands.

Note:  Note - Shaking the Qi out of the body is not the purpose of this move.

Wu Chi

Wu Chi or Emptiness is the most fundamental Qigong posture. Many Qigong movements begin and end with Wu Chi.
  1. Standing feet shoulder width apart and parallel.
  2. Knees slightly bent.
  3. Arms at side with gravity pulling the fingers to the ground.
  4. Shoulders relaxed with a natural slight rounding.
  5. Abdomen expands on inhalation and contract on exhalation.
  6. Head erect, lifting out of the Baibui point (top of head).
  7. Soften the gaze.
  8. Observe your body, mind and the flow of Qi.
Stand in Wu Chi at the beginning of your practice for 1 to 5 minutes. Repeatedly relax and correct your posture. Conclude your Qigong practice with Wu Chi for a couple of minutes.

The Perfect Qigong #1

Standing feet shoulder width apart, arms at side. The standard rules apply.
  1. Exhale interlace finger in front of groin, arms straight.
  2. Inhale palms up to chest.
  3. Exhale palms push straight out in front.
  4. Inhale palms pull into chest.
  5. Exhale push palms to ground, bending forward.
  6. Inhale pull palms up to chest and continue pushing palms to the sky, up on toes.
  7. Release fingers and exhale arms down to the sides.
Repeat cycle several times, each step once per cycle. Useful as a quick warm-up when you need to get the Qi flowing but not necessarily going to meditate. Commonly used as a warm-up before doing Eight Internal Iron Palm exercise.

Eight Internal Iron Palm

Standing feet shoulder width apart, arms at side. The standard rules apply.
  1. Push the Ground
  2. Push the Mountain
  3. Push the Walls
  4. Push the Sky
  5. Push Left Side and Right Up
  6. Push Right Side and Left Up
  7. Push Behind
  8. T'ai Chi Horse
or
  1. Push the Mountain
  2. Push the Walls
  3. Push the Ground
  4. Push the Sky
  5. Push Behind
  6. Push Right Side and Left Up
  7. Push Left Side and Right Up
  8. Gather the Energy
Execute the cycle once, repeating each step 8|16|32 times. Between each step do:
  1. Measuring the Qi.
  2. Spread the Qi.
Useful for people who do a lot of work with their hands and arms; typests, somatic workers and martial artists.

The Eight Brocades

Standing feet shoulder width apart, arms at side. The standard rules apply.
  1. Two Hands Reach Skyward
  2. Open the Bow
  3. Raise Each Arm
  4. Looking Behind
  5. Bending Over, Wagging the Tail
  6. Reaching Down
  7. Punching with Angry Gaze
  8. Toe Touching
Execute the cycle once. Repeat each step several times before proceeding to the next. General applicability, works the entire body.

The Sun Salutation, Surya Namaskar

The Sun Salutation is an invigorating cycle of 12 postures. Breath while moving from one posture to the next. Exhale when bending forward (steps 1, 3, 6, 8, 10, 12). Inhale when arching back (steps 2, 4, 7, 9, 11). Retain the breath for step 5.

Begin standing erect, feet together, arms at side. Some of the standard rules apply.

  1. Palms together, prayer position.
  2. Arms over head, arch back.
  3. Hands on ground beside feet, legs straight, head to knees.
  4. One leg back, crescent moon back bend, look up.
  5. Push-up position, feet together, back straight.
  6. Touch knees, chest and forehead to ground.
  7. Slide forward into Cobra.
  8. Lift hips into downward facing dog or inverted "V".
  9. Step forward into crescent moon back bend, look up.
  10. Feet together, hands on ground beside feet, head to knees.
  11. Stretch up, arch back with arms over head.
  12. Arms at side.
Repeat each cycle 6 to 12 times. General applicability, works the entire body.

Eight Pieces of Silk

Standing feet shoulder width apart, arms at side. The standard rules apply.
  1. Push up the heavens
  2. Draw the bow
  3. Raise the arms one at a time
  4. Turn the head from side to side
  5. Circle the arms (swaying the head and wagging the tail)
  6. Stretch out the hand, grab, pull, and spear hand
  7. Lift the jar and pound the legs
  8. Bend the back
Execute the cycle once. Repeat most steps several times before proceeding to the next. General applicability, works the entire body.

Taoist Five

Standing feet shoulder width apart, arms at side. The standard rules apply.
  1. Peaking through the clouds
  2. Priming the bellows (pulling silk)
  3. Fair lady works the shuttle
  4. Scooping the moon from the stream
  5. Reaching for the moon
Execute the cycle once. Repeat each step about 20 times before proceeding to the next. Keep the back straight, head erect and shoulders down. Use the legs but keep the knees protected with good biomechanics. General applicability, works the entire body.

The Standard Qigong Rules

These rules or guidelines are generally observed unless specified overwise. After you are able to sense the flow of Qi you are ready to being the practice of Qigong.

Links

Bibliography

A few of the books available to you about Prana, Qi, internal martial arts and Qigong: See also our recommended reading page.
* To the Shanti Jujitsu Dojo Qigong Practice class.

* To the Kodai No Bushido Jujitsu for Health class.

* To the Kodai No Bushido Curriculum, list of classes.

* To the Shanti Jujitsu Dojo Curriculum, list of classes.

* To the Recommended Books Page. *

* To Kodai No Bushido Home Page.

* To Shanti Jujitsu Dojo Home Page.

To Shanti Yoga Center Home Page.

* To Shanti Restoration Therapy Home Page.


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Last modified: $Date: 2004/12/28 14:13:03 $

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